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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
of russia's retaliation against an american law that puts sanctions on officials suspected of human rights violations. some senior government officials in moscow have spoken out against that law, but supporters argue the ban's necessary, because some adopted children have faced abuse by american families. joining me from moscow now is steve rosenberg. steve, you said he'd do it, he's done it. >> that's right, david. there's been one question that has dominated political life in moscow the last few days and that is will he or won't he? will president putin sign what is one of the most controversial laws he's been face with. yesterday he indicated he probably would and today he signed it. as you mentioned it has been very controversial because a number of ministers in his own government, including the russian foreign minister have publicly criticized the law and president putin's critics have accused him of playing politics with russian children. >> criticized it on humanitarian grounds. >> yes, absolutely. it's interesting to note that the bill we're talking about, the law we're talking abo
before the health care law kicks in. so, we are moving in that direction, particularly in the entitlement state. not reforming it, but actually expanding it. >> aen what happened this year was the supreme court helping this along, you have the justices essentially rewrite legislation changing the plain text that congress passed in order to declare obamacare constitutional, which is a little scary, that that highest justices in the land would take that sort of activist role and you mentioned france, dan, that's scary. the back drop of this whole presidential year is europe. we know where the path leads. and the turmoil and welfare states and how unsustainability and the high unemployment that comes with them and that was the back drop of our presidential campaign. >> paul: okay, the voters said, yeah, we're going to keep moving in that direction, kim. i mean, how, what do you think the electorate is here, behind the choices that jason just suggested they might be? >> barack obama won this election by very effectively making this a referendum about his opponent, mitt romney. so if you went
walker. he put through his right to work laws. he didn't want a recall. he was an inspiration for republican governors. it's a move gone all over the country. >> best politician bill clinton, who in a single speech at the democratic national convention injected energy and enthusiasm into the voters. >> herman cain was the leading republican contender. however, he was also the worst politician, but i'll get to that later. >> i had a long shot in naming chris christie because he firmed up his base in a democratic state. and i think at a time when the republicans now are seeing a resurgence among their moderates. i think in the long run he may prove to be the big winner of the year. >> these are all very interesting choices but they are all domestic. the best politician of 2012 was german chancellor angela merkle. she had to walk a tightrope between her german voters who do not favor bailing out europe and the european union. best politician, angela. you got it? you can write that down. pat, put it in your column. worst politician. >> susan rice. she was fed these phony talking p
to the people of cuba. the helms-burton law was not as effective as i would have liked. >> another issue out you are associated with is autism. how did that get started? >> my grandson was a very normal child. when he was 18 months to two years old, he got nine shots in one day. seven of which had thimerosol, mercury. it is a preservative. in 1929 it was tested on the 29 people who had meningitis. they said that the mercury had no impact so they started using solutions.halmologic when children get a few vaccinations, it did not have a huge impact but they started to get as many as 25 or 30 before they get to the first grade. my grandson got nine in one day and he became artistic, banging his head against the wall. then diary and constipation -- diarrhea and constipation. he was doing terrible. i was not aware of autism and all but i was chairman of the committee that did the investigation so i started to looking into with health and human services and the food and drug administration and that is where i had four years of hearings on that and i became convinced that women -- that mercury, women w
, the spanish government has changed laws regarding business hours. it wants visitors to the crisis- ridden country to have more time to spend money -- 90 hours a week instead of 72. >> it should help encourage trade and create more jobs in the sector. >> but the plans are threatening the siesta. the tradition of the lengthy break to unwind and relax is being sacrificed to the demands of the market. the spanish siesta was introduced in response to extreme working conditions. during the post-war period, it was not just the afternoon heat that force people to take a break. >> a lot of people had to take on two jobs at the same time. it was the only way to divide up the day so that you rested not just at night, but also had a break during the day. >> and health-care professionals say it is still a good idea. they recommend a 20-minute midday nap. they say it makes a difference at night. than a 10% of insomnia cases are chronic, and they are usually caused by work. we over lows hour days to the point where we no longer sleep well. we do not give ourselves break, and when we need more time, we t
it scandalous, grover cleveland's best friend and law partner was a guy named oscar fulsome. cleveland was born in new jersey and he spent most of his career in buffalo. he was a very successful lawyer and he and oscar were partners. they practice law together and they went out together and they would go out drinking and being together and it appears they enjoyed the services of maria halpern and together so when maria halpern and gets pregnant she has a son and neither knew who the father was. maria complicates things by naming the child oscar cleveland oscar fulsome had been married and had a daughter, frances. wheatland was a bachelors of cleveland accepted the responsibility and put the child in an orphanage. here's the other part of the scandal. oscar fulsome dies a few years later in a carriage accident. he is thrown from an apparently breaks his neck. he leaves a widow and a young girl frances and globe -- rover leave and make some enormous amount of money and cleveland takes care of the widow and the young girl, pays for them and sets them up in a nice home, best friend and former law p
they want to bill, the infrastructure, the programs they make into law. guest: i think james hits on the virtue of a flat tax, having a low, single rate, getting rid of all the loopholes in the tax code and having the government learn to live within its means. that would take some time, but it is eminently doable with positive reforms on the entitlement for younger people. you do not have to change the benefit formulas for those on medicare or social security or who are about to go on those systems. as younger people know, those systems are headed for a crash. the sooner we reform them in a positive way, the better. the key to do it is not by raising taxes, but by having a low single rate and they learn to live within it. i think you'll have a much more prosperous country for it. host: let's end where we started. what do you think the best solution in your personal view and your business view is to the fiscal cliff situation? guest: aside from not doing something foolish and the next three or four days -- that is why i do not mind kicking the can down the road -- would be to follo
in the united states is due to this one particular law passed in the 980s. -- 1980s. okay, then how does that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, how he sees it is he said, look, the big drivers are probably these economic forces, but the issue is that particularly in the united states the politics instead of trying to mitigate these very powerful economic forces has exacerbated them. so even as you have these economic forces creating much, much more concentration at
% of the boat. the government agrees -- there's a lot, under greek law whatever party comes in first, take a step back, greece has proportional representation that deserves a word of comment. proportional representation is the peculiar idea that if you get a certain percentage of the vote in an election, you should have the same percentage of delegates in congress that right the laws. it you didn't do that you exclude the 18% that had a role to play in governing which you think is the idea. in european countries we have proportional representation. if you get more than usually a cut off of 5% to get whatever the percentage of your vote is that is how many seats you get. you all understand i assume we don't do that in united states. if you get 51% of the vote you get it all and 49% wage. we have had proportional representation in the united states in the past. when you read about primary, and they a gets 20 delegates for the convention and candidate b, that is proportional, they get an equal number of delegates, we actually recognized in the united states proportional representation, we jus
. jefferson himself said that the duty of a magistrate is to the line of the law, but it is not the highest duty. that the survival and success of the country is your highest obligation. one person's imperial president i is another person's hero. one person's tyranny is another person's brilliant reform. part of what we have to struggle with from age to age in america is realizing that some generations there's going to be an excess of power useed in a way -- used in a way in which we approve, and in some generations there's going to be an excess of power used in ways which we would fight to the death against. but that's the way history has unfolded. and jefferson was on the right side of that in the very beginning. i want to talk about three quick lessons that i think all of us can, particularly our second term, early second term president might be able to take from jefferson. one goes to louisiana which is you need to be daring. jefferson understood that the political clock wasn't like a normal clock, it moved faster. ing as the president's clock ticks even in a first term, everybody else
. and the americans were skeptical. first, there were neutrality laws but there were also very strong isolationist sentiment in america. and even george marshall, who was chief military advisor to franklin roosevelt said, how can we send all these weapons to england if they're going to surrender to the british in a matter of weeks, and we end up fighting the germans? we will be charging into the face of our own weapons. but even though the operation was secret, it became headlines of course when it happened around the world. and everyone knew about it. and roosevelt and marshall were very, very effected by this. they thought if the british government can do this, they are serious. they are not going to negotiate with the germans. they're going to stay in this for as long as they possibly can. and it opened up the pathway for armaments to go to britain, which were very much needed and very much appreciated. >> brooke stoddard, when the official date of the so-called battle for britain, battle of britain? >> when were they? i think britain calls it july to the end of september, let's say. >> of 1940
and jefferson just kept spending -- the nail in the coffin for him financially was when he had alone with his in-laws. nicholas was speculating in kentucky land acquisitions, and he needed someone to cosign a $20,000 note and he talked jefferson into it and then six months later he went bankrupt. that's when the letters from monticello grill begin to get gloomy. -- really begin to get gloomy. >> i want to follow up -- >> we have a circulating microphone. >> all right. well, i want to follow-up on the kosciuszko will. of course after reading jim lewis' review yesterday when she called to book a train wreck, i thought maybe more to use this -- elaborate a little on the. you explain jefferson was made executor, and however, where i'm confused is that with 18 months of kosciuszko's death this will was contested by three different parties, in europe, one within the united states at the time, when that surface three different subsequent wills that had been drawn up in europe, and so i don't quite understand, and in jefferson -- at this point he said this is going to really fall into a lot of litigation. he
was the limit. that really was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i did go to law school. in the early 1980's when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice. i was going around to law firms. there were not that many women in the law firms. i had guys interview me. they would sit me down and say, do you understand you have to try cases? >> [laughter] >> i said that is what i wanted to do and was excited about it. i have clients in the beginning, i would go in to meet them. afterwards, one of my partners would say that they say that was not what i expected. he did not know there was going to be a lady lawyer on this case. but i really liked trying cases. it was a lot of fun. then i was drawn into politics. throughout my career, i have been interested in how to change things for the better. i have been very fortunate to have lots of opportunities to serve. >> you mentioned your mother. your mother died of lung cancer. she was such a force in your life. >> i think it made me very strong because it was very clear i had no one to depend on but me. >> 3 the o
. under the laws, those withholding rates are supposed to go up because, as you know, all thoughts tax cuts that were passed over a decade ago were supposed to expire. and the irs is basically on the sideline waiting to see what happens on the hill between them and the president to see if, in fact, there's a reason to tell the current employers, hold on, there will be a freeze on those rates. if, in fact, they have to go to the new guidance, consumers will start to feel very early the hit to their paychecks of having gone over the fiscal cliff, even if there's auto deal that retroactively drags us back over the top of the cliff. >> it's an interesting point. greg, thank you so much. such a mess. >>> it was better news at the box office lately. hollywood is on track to post an all-time box office record this year. film lovers have flocked the theaters to see christmas day performances of les miserables and "unchanged." >>> stick around. still to come on the show, the summer olympics and u.s. election made to 2012 a bumper user for advertisers. will that continue in 2013? we'll ask the c
'll see estate taxes go up, investment taxes go up. there is an endless list of expiring provisions of law that will, in fact, expire if nothing is done. and i think even if something is done at this point, what you're looking at is something very scaled back, something very small and congress will have to come back next year and take a look at trying to get to some of those other issues. >> alistair here. that sounds about right to me, assuming that that scenario is how things play out. what sort of impact medium term do you think this is going to have on consumer and corporate confidence in america, given that the fiscal cliff is clearly weighed heavily on both of those in recent months? >> the sad thing, you know, from an observer's standpoint here is that there isn't much corporate or consumer confidence in the american government. and it's proved itself dysfunctional time and again over the last couple of years. what you hear now is not how people believe that there's going to be some last-minute deal, but how they remember the times that the t.a.r.p. bill, the fiscal bailout a few ye
on africa and many believe now is the time. this is an overgeneralization. the rule of law is not widespread enough in the continent. there is a glimmer of hope such as sun nish sha. countries such as egypt still questionable. we have seen mass rioting there and growing concerns whether the new rule of law and new constitution will effectively protect investors. >> just a few years ago, there were maybe 10 frontier emerging funds. now, there's more than 300. they're the hot thing. remember, even if there is growth there, very little liquidity. that's not a real place for mom and pop investors. that's still a white knuckle place even if there is growth. >> i'm looking at global industries 52 week highs, turkey, france, uk. lithuania, japan. can those do well? >> i think so. they're coming off their bottom. europe 20 through wh-- europe 2 what was our 2008. >> you think merkel gets re-elected? >> at this point. she seems to be doing okay. if merkel gets re-elected, she will be a major outlier. the general rule of thumb for almost all politician, you never survive a debt crisis. germany doesn't
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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